ATLAS is a student-run publication with personal insights from student activists, artists, and athletes. The online magazine includes stories, personal anecdotes, and resources submitted by students experiencing teenagehood in America amidst the Black Lives Movement. It’s a beautifully laid-out and impressive accomplishment from these brilliant young minds!

UCLA TEP Intro to K-12 Ethnic Studies – UCLA is offering a free summer webinar series on teaching ethnic studies to K-12. The program, hosted by the UCLA Teacher Education Program Ethnic Studies Pathway, takes place every Monday and Thursday in July. Topics include current events and media, math and science pedagogy, and elementary education. Register here for these free webinars.  

Makeshift Homeschool is a student-created, self-directed learning app for students who may need to continue learning from home. This app is a community of kids creating courses to teach other kids, as they move up to different educator levels. From the mouths of the creators: “All kids need is to learn to love learning, permission to follow their passions, and freedom to create.” We will soon be interviewing the creators (ages 8 and 11) of Makeshift Homeschool, so check back into our blog. You can sign your kids up for Makeshift Homeschool at the WeQuil website. 

TXT (Teens Exploring Technology) is a Los Angeles-based non-profit organization that inspires young men of color from low-income communities to explore technology careers. The organization and its mentors teach code to these young men, as well as youth development, business development, and design teaching. Visit their website to see how to get involved as a mentor or volunteer.

"The Endless but ‘Joyful’ Work of Creating Anti-Racist Education" – Mindshift from KQED’s topics on antiracist education include interviews from NPR”s All Things Considered. In a recent interview with anti-racist educator Pirette McKamey, the high school principal talks about flipping the deficit model (looking at students as if there is something wrong with them), the importance of leadership, the ongoing nature of anti-racist education, and more.

Culture in the Classroom – We previously published blog articles on diversity and culturally responsive classrooms, and we felt that now would be a good time to revisit this subject as more teachers look toward anti-racist education. 

Let us know in the comments if any news, events, projects, people, or organizations in the education industry have sparked your interest!